Inkjet Printing With Genuine Pixels - Resources
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Inkjet Printing with Genuine Pixels - Resources





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Chapter 3 Resources

Click to download these images - These are large files, please allow a few seconds to download
Pic 1 (Nikon Camera)
Pic 2
Pic 3
Pic 4
Pic 5
Pic 6
Pic 7
Pic 8




A3 Evaluation Images

Click to download these images - These are large files, please allow a few seconds to download
36mp at 180ppi
36mp at 240ppi
36mp at 300ppi
36mp at 480ppi
36mp at 720ppi




A4 Evaluation Images

Click to download these images - These are large files, please allow a few seconds to download
36mp at 180ppi
36mp at 240ppi
36mp at 300ppi
36mp at 480ppi
36mp at 720ppi
36mp at 1440ppi




5x7 Evaluation Images

Click to download these images: - These are large files, please allow a few seconds to download
36mp at 180ppi
36mp at 240ppi
36mp at 300ppi
36mp at 480ppi
36mp at 760ppi
36mp at 720ppi
36mp at 900ppi
36mp at 1080ppi
36mp at 1260ppi
36mp at 1440ppi




Martin Evening Correspendence

Click Here to View the Email Thread





Ben Long Correspendence

Click Here to View the Email Thread




Master Image (Tiff file unedited)

Click to download this image - large file, please allow a few seconds to download




John Read CV

Trained in the 70s as Senior Electronics Officer with Cunard Steamship Co.  Worked on early Decca solid-state collision avoidance radar, an early application of computer control of pixels.  Responsible for electronics systems found on cargo and container ships of that era.  Design and manufacture of darkroom equipment with Marrutt until the late 80s, thereafter assisting Lyson with the development and marketing of professional photographic monochrome and colour inksets.  Overseeing the creation of high-end photographic inkjet inks, papers and presentation products for the Marrutt Digital brand. Author and presenter of YouTube video series: ‘Inkjet Printing Masterclass’ and ‘Marrutt YouTube Channel’
Interests: Sailing, Photography, Physics and Family.



 
Transcripts

CHAPTER 1:

To camera - at desk with A4 prints ranged in front:

“If you have a digital camera over 12 megapixels, and you size up your images for print to 300ppi, you are probably throwing away a large portion of your genuine pixels when printing at various sizes, leaving software to fill in the gaps - See our new video:
 
      “Inkjet Printing with Genuine Pixels”

- which shows you how to improve your print quality, tone and detail simply by sizing your image correctly to current 2018 best practice; goes through the basics, worked examples, a simple spreadsheet guide to suit your camera and print size, and links to test images for you to download and print for yourself”

CHAPTER 2:

To camera: 2 1/4” square neg and scissors normal picture background:

“Imagine, years ago, when we all had film cameras, taking your medium format 2 1/4” square or 35mm films in for processing, and you found out that your film laboratory cuts your negs down to half or even a quarter of the original size “because we’ve always done it this way” - and “we make up your neg size in the darkroom with some clever tricks” - Well, that’s pretty well what we do every time we send images from modern high pixel-count DSLRs and digital backs and resize your images for print down to 300 pixels per inch!!
“If we take our 36 megapixel image from our full-frame DSLR and print from our resampled and averaged 300ppi image sized to A3 or US 17” x 11“, we loose over HALF of the original pixels which came from our camera sensor - the modern form of film”
“If we take our 36 megapixel image from our full-frame DSLR and print from our resampled and averaged 300ppi image sized to A4 or US 8.5” x 11”,we loose over  THREE QUARTERS of the genuine pixels!”
“To be fair, when we cut our image files down to 300 ppi, we are obeying an old, out of date bit of advice, which in the days of 4mp cameras and slow computers, (around 1998) made sense; resampling down involves taking average values from all our camera sensor pixels, then your amazingly clever software creates fewer artificial pixels based on those averages.  Finally, those pixels are handed over to the printer driver, which splits them up and re-maps the data into droplet information which we then measure in dots per inch, so although we may loose over half of the genuine camera pixels in some cases, the actual inkjet print we get is visually not too bad AT A CONSUMER LEVEL!!.”
“For Professional Photographers or keen Enthusiasts with modern high pixel-count digital cameras, however, a higher level of image print reproduction is available, if the document resolution is applied correctly according to sensor pixel count and physical size of the final inkjet print.”  - “Lets take a break here, and pick up where we left off in the next movie”

CHAPTER 3:

“Picking up from where we left off comparing film negs to camera sensor pixels, let’s now go over pixels to droplets in detail:-” (Pic 1 - Pic 2 )“You take a picture with a full-frame 36 megapixel digital camera - you have captured, say, 7360 x 4912  pixels from a CMOS sensor measuring
36mm x 24mm (1.4” x .9”) - 36,152,320 pixels in total” (Pic 3) “Our camera resizes these pixels to 72 pixels per inch at an image size of 102” x 68” - you still have the same number of pixels, but at a different scale - it’s a bit like starting out with pixels the size of postage stamps, and ending up with the same number of carpet tiles! - physically much bigger, but containing exactly the same amount of information - notice on this  screen grab that we have just over 103 Megabytes of file size from what we understand as 36 million pixels - as this is an 8 bit file, with three colour channels (red / green / blue) we multiply our megapixel count by just under 3. If it was a 16 bit file in RGB, we would multiply by just under 6 - conversion
from megapixels to megabytes is a complicated subject, so let’s keep things simple, and just talk about millions of pixels.
    (Pic 4 )  - This image file is transferred to our computer software, say Adobe PhotoShop, Elements, Lightroom, whatever, and we prepare our  image in this software to a manageable image size that our inkjet printer can handle, usually by the ‘image > resize’ or ‘image > crop’ tool, in this case to A4 (297mm x 210mm), or for our US friends, to 8.5” x 11”, at a resolution that for nearly twenty years we all been advised to set as around 300 pixels per inch. This gives us an image file of around 3508 x 2480 - just over 8.5 million pixels - or in this case just under 25 MB! -

video 2
We have just taken a sample of each pixel, and averaged it down in one of three ways: (Pic 5) Nearest Neighbor - looking at the nearest pixel, and matching colour and tone. Bi-linear - looking at the 4 surrounding pixels and finding an average Bi-cubic - looking at the 16 surrounding pixels and finding an average, but giving more influence to the closest pixels - most photographers favour Bi-cubic interpolation..
In this case, out of every four pixels,only one remains, of a colour value determined by the averaging method that your software has been instructed
to follow.  The excess pixels are then disposed of, not to be seen again within this particular image file going forward to the printer.
    (Pic 6) - Our computer gives this information to our inkjet printer via a ‘printer driver’ software application, supplied by the inkjet printer manufacturer, in this case Epson, in which we instruct the inkjet printer how much ink to spray on (paper type) Pic 7 Screen Grab of printer driver

“- AND HOW MANY DROPLETS WE WANT TO SPLIT EACH PIXEL INTO - this is the point at which we start talking about dots per inch, not pixels
per inch - this is resolution (or print ‘quality’) which can be anything from ‘draft’ at 360 dots per inch to ‘fine’ at 720 dots per inch to ‘SuperFine’ at
1440 dots per inch to ‘SuperPhoto’ at 5760 dots per inch - These descriptions are Epson words, but you will find similar descriptions with Canon, HP etc.”  

Pic 8 Screening of dots on paper image
“The printer driver does not simply split up each pixel and spread dots evenly over the page; there is a sophisticated screening process going
on, that realistically emulates continuous smooth tone, to produce a photorealistic reproduction of the original captured image.”

“Modern printer drivers operate within a much faster operating system environment, and carry out their droplet array algorithms to a far smaller  variable drop size; for Epson, the old 1440 dpi standard has increased to 5760dpi emulation, and droplet volume has reduced down to 2 pico litres  minimum in the case of the latest Epson pro photo inkjet printers in 2018:”
“Ultra fine MicroDots represent the very smallest size of ink droplets available today. Ultra MicroDots are between 2 and 6 picolitres in volume
resulting in a dot diameter up to 4 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair and close to the limit of resolution for the human eye. These new incredibly small dots lead to much finer detail with less graininess and even smoother Gradations. Print quality is considerably enhanced.”
“Canon claim 4 pico litre and 4800 dpi for their top photo inkjet printers for 2018; Ink droplets can be placed with a minimum pitch of 1/4800 of an inch”.
In my opinion, it makes sense to feed modern printer drivers with as many genuine camera sensor pixels as possible, and allow the printer driver
software to to carry out the majority of the image processing that turns genuine camera pixels into ink droplet data.  Countless visual print  observations appear to bear out this opinion from different levels of digital camera, printing at various sizes”
“Let’s stop here. and continue this in the next movie”

CHAPTER 4:

“Continuing from the last video::
“If I don’t have a full-frame camera - does this still affect me?”

A4 print in foreground:

“This observation holds good for cameras with 12 - 24 megapixel sensors, particularly when printing A4 (or 8.5” x 11” US) or smaller, because you have less room to accomodate your captured pixels within the physical size of your print”.

“If you use every available genuine pixel from your digital camera sensor, you are likely to produce a more accurate and detailed  photographic inkjet print with genuine tones, sharpness, contrast and detail.  This observation holds true for a wide range
of digital camera types and print sizes - all you need to do is a simple bit of maths and a re-think of your document resolution prior to printing, and for high-end inkjet printing, abandon the idea that everything you print has to be resampled down to 300ppi”

Pic of spreadsheet:
“We have created a simple mini spreadsheet for you to follow, which can be downloaded from a link below this video”  

“This advice applies to colour AND black & white inkjet printing - and to a lesser degree, but still significant, are smaller sensor digital cameras.”

A3 print in foreground:

“And if you use a full-frame 36 mp camera or digital back of up to 50 mp and beyond, you are probably throwing away a large proportion of genuine image pixels at MOST print sizes up to A2 (or 17” x 22“ US), if you resample your image file to the traditional convention of 300 ppi document resolution.”  “..Let’s take a break, and start again in the next movie”

CHAPTER 5:

To camera Ben Long print on left, Martin Evening on right:

“To follow on from the last clip” “What do other experts say on this?”

“After many conversations with printer technicians, high-end pro photographers and hours of practical print comparisons, we have concluded that better print quality is visually noticeable in many images that have fine detail if we ignore the old convention that tells you to resize every print document to 300 ppi at the actual print size you are producing.  In addition, we have consulted with two renowned authorities on digital photography, whose own take on this subject can be seen by clicking on links at the end of this video:”   

“Ben Long is an award-winning photographer and senior editor at Macworld magazine. He lectures around the world and online via Lynda.com”

“Martin Evening - An acknowledged expert in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, he has written 24 books about these two programs to date”
“A number of experienced printer technicians have told us that this arbitrary 300pi resolution limit was placed on us years ago partly because computer speeds back then would not allow us to process much larger files within an acceptable time. Since then, computer data processing has speeded up considerably, and digital camera sensor pixel counts have risen dramatically also.  A conversation with Epson Technical in the UK has confirmed that 300ppi is an arbitary figure which is not neccesarily the most appropriate document resolution for higher pixel count camera
sensors”    “There are many published guides and articles in existence which recommend using 300ppi as a standard resolution for print;
check the date of writing - most of these articles are a good few years old, and are no longer relevant to high pixel count camera
sensors, faster computer data processing and printer drivers emulating up to 5760 dots per inch” - “Let’s take a break here,
and continue in our next movie”.

CHAPTER 6:

“Visual print comparisons at A3 (11” x 17“ US)” - Chapter 6
To camera, A3 prints in foreground:
“To follow on from the last time,”“We have a demonstration for you with an image by Dr Philip Westwood, Member of the Royal Photographic Society using a Nikon D800 Full-Frame 36mp DSLR, captured in RAW, processed to a TIFF, uncropped and unedited in any way.  Printed on a brand new Epson Surecolor P600 Inkjet Printer connected by USB printer cable to a four year old iMac using basic
Adobe Photoshop Elements 13 software with Marrutt Professional Inks on Marrutt 265gsm Pro Photo Satin - brand new custom printer
profile, highest printer resolution of 5670 dpi, no high speed. - The only difference between these prints is the document size as resampled
from the original file from the camera in Photoshop; document resolution at the intended size to print - in this case 297mm x 420mm
- A3 borderless” In US sizes pretty much 17” x 11” . - “Resize from your camera file either by Image > Resize or Image > Crop command.”
“Bear in mind that our video equipment will be unable to convey the really noticeable visual differences in detail, definition,
sharpness and contrast - we advise you to try this for yourself; we have 180ppi, 240ppi, 300ppi, 360ppi, 480ppi and 720ppi - printed to A3, which is 297mm x 420mm or 11” x 17” US equivalent.
“To my eyes, the 180ppi and 240ppi prints appear soft and indistinct, the 300ppi print is an acceptable image, but the 360ppi print is clearly more defined with more tone, definition, detail and contrast.  Theoretically, the absolute optimum document resolution for this sensor size and print size is 455ppi, and we can discern a marginal improvement from 360ppi to 480ppi.  The 720ppi print is visually identical to the 480ppi version, as you would expect, the genuine pixel content in both versions being identical.”
“If we follow our spreadsheet guidelines, a 12mp camera image would be best sized up at 300ppi at this print size, for 16mp it would be the
same at 300ppi,  for a 24mp camera 360ppi would be best, for 36mp cameras 420ppi would be good, and for 50mp high-end cameras, a
document resolution of 480ppi at this size would include all camera sensor pixels”.
“We have included these image files at the various document reolutions in a working files folder that you can downoad and print for yourself
- Links to these resources can be found below”  “Let’s stop now, and continue in the next video”

CHAPTER 7:

To camera, A4 prints in foreground:
“To follow on from our last video, in which we looked at A3 prints at various document resolutions, let’s carry this on with a smaller prints: A4, which is around 8.5” x 11” in US size.”
“Same as last video, image from a full-frame 36 megapixel camera, uncropped and unedited, the only difference between these prints is the document size as resampled from the original file from the  camera in Photoshop; document resolution at the intended size to
print - in this case 210mm x 297mm - A4 borderless.  Resize from your camera file either by Image > Resize or Image > Crop command”
“Allowing for the limitations of our video equipment, which will tend to average out the visual differences between these prints - I can clearly see the really noticeable differences in detail, definition,  sharpness and contrast - we advise you to try this for yourself; we
have 180ppi, 240ppi, 300ppi, 360ppi, 480ppi, 600ppi, 720ppi and even 1400ppi printed to A4, which is 8.5” x 11” US equivalent”
“To my eyes, the 180pp and 240ppi prints appear soft and indistinct, the 300ppi print is an acceptable image, but the 600ppi print is  clearly more defined with more tone, definition, detail and contrast.”
“Theoretically, the absolute optimum document resolution for this 36MP sensor size and A4 print size is 600ppi, as you need a high pixel density to pack into the small A4 format, if we are to include as many genuine camera pixels as possible - The prints at 600ppi, 720ppi and 1440ppi are identical, as you would expect, using the same number of genuine camera sensor pixels in each print.” If we have a 12mp camera, the best document resolution at this size if 360ppi.  For 16mp cameras, it would be 420ppi.  24mp camera document resolution at this size would be 480ppi, and full-frame 36mp camera images would be best at 600ppi.  High-end 50mp camera images need 720pp at this print size”.
“Is it that important to print to the limit of our genuine pixel count  from our DSLR sensor? - Not for every image, of course, but those
of us who have invested in higher pixel count, full-frame DSLRs or digital backs should be aware of the higher level of true
photographic clarity and accurate detail available to us when we break through the 300ppi document resolution barrier - try creating
test prints for yourself, and let us know your results.  Those of us with lower pixel count digital cameras also need to be aware of
this issue when we print smaller sized prints, because we have less physical print size to accomodate all those high quality genuine pixels” - “Lets break here -we’ll take this up again in the next movie”

CHAPTER 8:

To camera, 5” x 7” prints in foreground:
“To follow on from our last video, in which we looked at A4 prints at various document resolutions, let’s carry this on with a smaller
prints: 5” x 7”
“Same as last video, image from a full-frame 36 megapixel camera, uncropped and unedited, the only difference between these prints
is the document size as resampled from the original file from the camera in Photoshop; document resolution at the intended size to print - in this case 5” x 7“ borderless.  Resize from your camera file either by Image > Resize or Image > Crop command”
“Allowing for the limitations of our video equipment, which will tend to average out the visual differences between these prints - I
can clearly see the really noticeable differences in detail, definition, sharpness and contrast - we advise you to try this for yourself; we
have 180ppi, 240ppi, 300ppi, 360ppi, 480ppi, 600ppi, 720ppi 900ppi, 1080ppi, 1260ppi and even 1440ppi printed to 5” x 7 from a 36mp camera
“To my eyes, the 180pp and 240ppi prints appear soft and indistinct, the 300ppi print is an acceptable image, but the 720ppi print is
clearly more defined with more tone, definition, detail and contrast.”
“Theoretically, the absolute optimum document resolution for this 36MP sensor size and 5” x 7“ print size is 720ppi, as you need a high
pixel density to pack into the small format, if we are to include as many genuine camera pixels as possible - The prints above 720ppi
up to1440ppi are identical, as you would expect, using the same number of genuine camera sensor pixels in each print.”
If we have a 12mp camera, the best document resolution at this size if 600ppi.  For 16mp cameras, it would be 600ppi.  24mp camera
document resolution at this size would be 720ppi, and full-frame 36mp camera images would be best at 720ppi as well.  High-end 50mp
camera images need 1200pp at this print size”. “If your camera has a slightly lower sensor pixel count than the megapixel categories here, simply go to the next higher MP camera.”
“If your camera image is cropped down to a lower total genuine pixel count, don’t worry, use the same document resolution figure, as it is
better to have slightly more genuine pixels than required than less - I explain this aspect in greater detail in a later video”.
- “Lets break here -we’ll take this up again in the next movie”

CHAPTER 9:

“To take up from where we left off last time, lets explain all this with some very simple maths:-

50mp panel:
50 mp sensor: 8272 x 6200 pixels (51,286,400 total)
(Hassleblad XD1-50C)

print at 300ppi at A4 uses only 3507 x 2478 pixels (8,690,346 total)
- over 80% of genuine pixels lost.. - Five genuine pixels averaged out into one pixel remaining
- ideal document resolution would be around 720ppi to use almost every genuine pixel

print at 300ppi at A3 uses only 4960 x 3507 pixels (17,394,720 total)
- over 60 percent of genuine pixels lost..  - Three genuine pixels averaged out into one pixel remaining
- ideal document resolution would be around 480ppi to use almost every genuine pixel

print at 300ppi at A2 uses only 7014 x 4959 pixels (34,782,426 total)
- over 30% of genuine pixels lost..  - Only a third of a pixel lost for every one pixel remaining - not too bad actually..
- ideal document resolution would be around 360ppi to use almost every genuine pixel”

“To summarize, for extremly high pixel-count digital cameras, over 50 megapixels, to use genuine captured camera sensor pixels in your print, you will need to prepare your document resolution at a high 720ppi for A4, 480ppi for A3 and 360ppi for A2 - for our US friends, that means 720ppi for 8.5” x 11”, 480ppi for 17” x 11” and 360ppi for 17” x 22” - the bigger the print, the lower document resolution you need, as you have more printing size to accomodate all those genuine pixels.  The smaller the print, then higher document resolutions are needed, to accomodate all those genuine camera sensor pixels”

“We’ll take a break here, and continue this subject within the next movie”

CHAPTER 10:

“Carrying on from our last video, let’s look at the most popular scenario for Pro Photographers and Keen Enthusiasts, using full-frame 36 megapixel digital cameras:-

36mp panel:
36 mp sensor: 7360 x 4912 pixels (36,152,320 total)
(Nikon D800)  
print at 300ppi at A4 uses only 3507 x 2478 pixels (8,690,346 total)
- over 75% of genuine pixels lost.. - Four genuine camera pixels averaged out to one pixel remaining
- ideal document resolution would be around 600ppi to use almost every genuine pixel

print at 300ppi at A3 uses only 4960 x 3507 pixels (17,394,720 total)
- over 50 percent of genuine pixels lost.. - Two genuine camera pixels averaged out to one pixel remaining.
- ideal document resolution would  be around 420ppi to use almost every genuine pixel


print at 300ppi at A2 uses 7014 x 4959 pixels (34,782,426 total)
- almost every pixel used at this resolution - Virtually every genuine camera sensor pixel is used at this size and document resolution.
- ideal document resolution would stay at around 300ppi to use virtually every genuine pixel”

“To summarize, for full-frame cameras like this, to utilise all your genuine camera sensor pixels in your prints, you will need to prepare  your document resolution at a high 600ppi for A4, 420ppi for A3 and for A2 you can leave your document resolution at the usual 300ppi.
- for our US friends, that means 600ppi for 8.5” x 11”, 420ppi for 17” x 11” and for 17” x 22” set to the traditional document resolution of 300ppi. - The bigger the print, the lower document resolution you need, as you have more printing size to accomodate all those genuine
pixels.  The smaller the print, then higher document resolutions are needed. to accomodate all those genuine camera sensor pixels”
“We’ll break here, to continue in the next movie”

CHAPTER 11:

“To continue with our worked examples, our third example is with a popular medium level DSLR:-

24mp panel:
24 mp sensor: 6000 x 4000 pixels  (24,000,000 total)
(Canon EOS 200D)
print at 300ppi at A4 uses only 3507 x 2478 pixels (8,690,346 total) - over two thirds of genuine pixels lost.. - Three genuine camera
pixels averaged out to one pixel remaining - ideal document resolution would be around 480ppi to use virtually every genuine pixel

print at 300ppi at A3 uses only 4960 x 3507 (17,394,720)
- over a quarter of genuine pixels lost - Four genuine camera pixels averaged out to three pixels remaining.
- ideal document resolution would  be around 360ppi to use virtually every genuine pixel

print at 300ppi at A2 uses 7014 x 4959 pixels (34,782,426 total)
- almost every pixel used at this resolution - Virtually every genuine camera sensor pixel is used at this size and document resolution.
- ideal document resolution would stay at around 300ppi to use virtually every genuine camera sensor pixel”

“To summarize, for medium level DSLRs like this, to utilise all your genuine camera sensor pixels in your prints, you will need to prepare
your document resolution at a high 480ppi for A4, 360ppi for A3 and for A2 you can leave your document reolution at the usual 300ppi.
- for our US friends, that means 480ppi for 8.5” x 11”, 360ppi for 17” x 11” and for 17” x 22” set to the traditional document resolution
of 300ppi.  The bigger the print, the lower document resolution you need, as you have more printing size to accomodate all those genuine
pixels.  The smaller the print, then higher document resolutions are needed, to accomodate all those genuine camera sensor pixels”
“Let’s stop now, and pick up more information on smaller pixel-count cameras in the next movie”

CHAPTER 12

“Continuing from our last chapter, we are already getting early feedback from the first movies on ‘inkjet printing with genuine pixels’ that have been released early - let’s deal with some of the best questions we’ve been asked:-”

Q: “If my camera megapixel count is smaller than a category in your spreadsheet, or I have cropped my image down to less than the full capture area of my camera sensor, what ppi do I use for resolution?”
A: “As it is better to include more pixels from our camera sensor than less, I would advise you to use the next larger megapixel camera category as your guide for selecting the correct document resolution for a particular print size.  If your image is cropped down, still use the same figure we advise for the full megapixel count for your particular digital camera.  The reason I say this is that from our observations, image print quality is unchanged when you exceed the genuine sensor pixel count, but if your reduce the document resolution to below your genuine pixel count, you start to detect very small reductions in quality”

Q: “If you are printing a smaller size, say 6” x 4“ or 5” x 7” or 8” x 10”, with a correspondingly smaller viewing distance, what resolutions do I select for various camera pixel counts?”
A; 6“ x 4”  36mp - 1200ppi 24mp - 1000ppi 16mp - 820ppi 12mp - 720ppi 5” x 7” 36mp - 720ppi  24mp - 720ppi 16mp - 600ppi 12mp - 600ppi 10” x 8” 36mp - 720ppi  24mp - 600ppi  16mp - 480ppi  12mp - 420ppi
“We have created a small format image resolution calculator for these camera and print sizes on PDF download - see below for the link..”

Q: “Surely, if I just keep my overall pixel count the same, I am doing the same thing?”
A:  Yes, so long as at no time in your workflow, you allow your genuine pixel count to fall below your original sensor pixel count - once you have disposed of pixels, you can’t re-create them.

Q: “Epson have a printer native resolution of 360ppi, and Canon native printer resolution is 300ppi - who do I believe?”
 A: - “The idea of a ‘printer native resolution’ came into being some years ago,as a simplification of the term ‘recommended document resolution’ in the days when a 4 megapixel camera was a good average, so let’s treat these ‘printer native resolutions’ as consumer-level guidlines, based on much smaller digital cameras, slower processing speeds and let’s face it, a general reduction in expectation of photographic quality for digital printing in general”

Q; ”Surely if my clients are happy with my print results up to now, why change my methods?
A: - It’s up to you, I’ve been told by very experienced printworkers that the file format ‘JGE’ should be used at all times - that stands for ‘JUST GOOD ENOUGH’ - I personally feel that as a professional photographer or keen enthusiast, we should always strive for the BEST PRINT QUALITY we can sensibly achieve at all times”

Q: “This all seems to be a marginal improvement over my existing method - why should I bother?
A: ”Similar to the previous question - I would add that in this era of the threat of smartphone photography, we should use every tool at our disposal to differentiate PROFESSIONAL PRINT STANDARDS with CONSUMER QUALITY LOW RES IMAGING”

Q: “Do I need to change my custom printer profiles when printing at these higher document resolutions?”
A: “Not immediately, but as custom printer profiles really need checking and replacing if required every six months, it‘s not a bad idea to get us to re-profile anyway - it’s always a free service from us anyway”

Q: “I can’t really see much difference on your videos - how can I actually see the changes for myself?”
A: “Use our downloadable test images at various document resolutions; print them out and see for yourself!”

Q: “Can I come to your showroom and see your prints for myself?”
A: “Yes, we’re just outside Eastbourne on the South Coast of England - we would love to see you if you can make it!”

“Any questions not dealt with here, use e-mail or FaceBook to challenge any of our statements and opinions - We’ll stop now and continue in our next video..”

CHAPTER 13:

To camera with printers and computers in background:

“In the last video in this series, let’s tie up a few loose ends, and see where we go from here:-”

“In the past, when creating a print for commercial use, enthusiast or camera club competition, we have often thrown away many genuine captured pixels if we use high pixel-count digital cameras, which cannot be recovered during image editing.  Pixels are not the only consideration when searching for better print quality from your original image file:  Dynamic Range, sharpening issues, editing techniques, inkjet ink and paper quality, printer type and condition - all have an important part to play - subscribe to our regular Marrutt YouTube tutorials to keep up to date with current best practice”

“Use these guidelines to check for yourself whether your printing benefits from these observations.  Remember that your inkjet printer driver settings should be set at the highest possible print resolution, no high speed and ideally use an up to date custom printer profile, which we provide free of charge for the life of your printer when you buy Marrutt inkjet papers. Also bear in mind that using higher document resolutions inevitably creates larger files - keep to 8 bit RGB, ensure that your computer is in good, efficient condition - plenty of spare memory, no other applications open, recent anti-virus and defragmentation carried out, a short, high-quality printer cable with no sharing hub or Wi-Fi and you should find that these high resolution image documents process in a reasonable time.”    

“Does it really matter that our prints are made up of artificially created software pixels, so long as the final result does not look too bad? - In many cases, no; but there ARE times when we want to take every ounce of quality from our expensive high-end digital camera, and create an accurate, faithful, stunning print - a permanent record of our creative photographic inspiration”
“This presentation is not intended as a suggestion that you blindly follow this advice, rather a set of observations to start a conversation on this subject, and you may wish to try out a few of these document resolutions for yourself - Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel and follow us on FaceBook”

“To conclude this video series, you will find a resources folder you can click on below, containing correspondence from Martin Evening and Ben Long on this subject, and a series of test images at various document resolutions for you to print out and view for yourself.  Please contact us, and let us know your results; whether you feel that there is a worthwhile improvement, or otherwise.  We will be publishing a continuing record of this feedback within this folder, so you will be able to benefit from shared experience from printworkers around the world.”

“Finally, I would like to thank the many individuals who have helped with this project, specifically Philip Westwood for his images used throughout this presentation, Ben Long and Martin Evening for their independent opinions, the whole Marrutt team, Paul Read and Andrew Sweeney for their technical input, and lastly the countless online members of the Royal Photographic Society, British Institute of Professional Photography, Association of Photographers, Societies of Wedding and Portrait Photographers, Master Photographers Association, PAGB Camera Clubs, the FIAP, the Photo Marketing Association and the Photographic Society of America - these critical and in-depth conversations with the online photographic community have helped shape the format and substance of this video series and for that I am extremely grateful.”


“Thank you for watching..”